Public Notice

Public Notice

Stage 1 – Water Conservation Alert

05.28.2019

Bolivia, NC – Brunswick County thanks the users of public water systems throughout the county for using water wisely over the Memorial Day weekend and asks public water system users to continue to be diligent in using water wisely. Drought conditions are expected to continue for the foreseeable weather forecast and water demands are expected to increase as vacationers visit Brunswick County beaches. Demand for water over the Memorial Day weekend exceeded 90% of the available production and distribution capacity. To ensure adequate water is available for essential needs, Brunswick County has declared a Stage 1 Water Conservation Alert effective immediately. All customers of a public water system anywhere in Brunswick County are affected by Water Conservation Alerts. Brunswick County Public Utilities provides water service in unincorporated portions of Brunswick County as well as the following communities: Boiling Spring Lakes, Bolivia, Calabash, Carolina Shores, Caswell Beach, Sandy Creek, St. James, Sunset Beach, and Varnamtown. Customers of other utilities such as Bald Head Island, Brunswick Regional – H2GO (Belville), Holden Beach, Leland, Navassa, Northwest, Oak Island, Ocean Isle Beach, Shallotte, and Southport are under the same restrictions since these utilities receive their water from Brunswick County Public Utilities.

Under a Stage 1 Water Alert, water system customers are requested to make voluntary adjustments to their water usage habits to appreciably reduce peak demands. (A peak demand of 80% of system production and distribution capacity being targeted). Irrigation demands represent the bulk of non-essential water use, so a primary way that customers may reduce water usage is to limit irrigation. A unified application of voluntary water reductions by all water system users in Brunswick County may help to avoid mandatory water restrictions in the event drought conditions do not lessen.

Specific ways to reduce water usage are as follows:
1. Defer all non-essential water use to outside the peak demand hours of 5:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m; preferably after nightfall.
2. Don’t overwater your yard. One inch of water per week in the summer will keep most types of grass healthy. To determine how long you need to run your sprinkler to provide 1” of water, place straight edged cans at different distances from your sprinkler and time how long it takes to fill an average of 1” of water in each can. Water occasionally, but deeply to encourage deeper rooting that makes grass more drought/heat tolerant.
3. Install rain shut-off devices on automatic sprinkler systems.
4. Don’t water pavement and impervious surfaces.
5. Use the following recommended irrigation schedule to even out system demands:
a. Odd address numbers – Tuesday/Thursday/Saturday
b. Even address numbers – Wednesday/Friday/Sunday
c. No irrigation on Mondays
6. Limit lawn watering to that necessary for plant survival. Water lawns outside of the peak demand hours of 5:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m; preferably after nightfall.
7. Water shrubbery the minimum required. Water shrubbery outside of the peak demand hours of 5:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. Use drip irrigation systems in shrubbery beds and around trees to prevent water loss through evaporation.
8. Use abundant mulch around trees and shrubs to retain moisture.
9. Plant drought-tolerant grasses, trees, and plants.
10. Adjust mower height to a higher setting to retain moisture.
11. Limit the use of clothes washers and dishwashers and when used, operate fully loaded. Operate dishwashers outside of the peak demand hours of 5:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m; preferably after nightfall.
12. Limit vehicle washing to a minimum. Use commercial car washes that recycle water.
13. Use shower for bathing rather than bathtub and limit shower to no more than five (5) minutes.
14. Inspect and repair all faulty and defective parts of faucets and toilets. Pay attention to dripping sounds.
15. Do not leave faucets running while shaving, brushing teeth, rinsing or preparing food.
16. Do not wash down outside areas such as sidewalks, driveways, patios, etc.
17. Install water-saving showerheads and other water conservation devices.
18. Install water-saving devices in toilets such as early closing flappers.
19. Limit hours of water-cooled air conditioners.
20. Keep drinking water in a container in the refrigerator instead of running water from a faucet until it is cool.
21. Do not fill new (or empty) swimming or wading pools. Top off existing swimming pools from dusk until dawn.
22. Cover pool and spas when not in use to prevent evaporation.
23. Use disposable and biodegradable dishes where possible.

Please note that this Stage 1 Water Conservation Alert does not affect the use of private groundwater wells or those using highly treated reclaimed wastewater. (St. James, Winding River, Sea Trail, and Sandpiper Bay golf courses use reclaimed water. Other golf courses use wells and ponds for irrigation.) Also, this is not a water quality advisory; this is a water conservation advisory. There is no need to boil water for potable use unless you receive a Low Pressure Advisory notice for your specific area due to other conditions in the water distribution system.

Residents will be notified if any other conservation measures are needed and when conditions dictate that restrictions are no longer required. Residents who have questions should contact their water service provider directly or Brunswick County Public Utilities at 910-253-2657. Additional information can be found at

http://www.brunswickcountync.gov/files/utilities/2015/02/util_water_conservation_utilities_brochure.pdf

http://www.brunswickcountync.gov/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/smart-tips-for-the-home-yard.pdf

– End –

UPDATE – Stage 1 – Water Conservation Alert – UPDATE

06.06.2019

UPDATE – Stage 1 – Water Conservation Alert – UPDATE

Bolivia, NC – A Stage 1 Water Conservation Alert was instituted for all customers of any Brunswick County public water system on May 28, 2019, due to record water demand caused by excessive temperatures, lack of rain, and an increased number of visitors to Brunswick County. As a result of customers’ voluntary conservation measures combined with a break in the drought conditions, water demand has been reduced to more manageable levels. We thank you for your efforts to conserve water and to use it wisely. Although there has been some relief in the past week, hot, dry conditions are expected to return as we get into the summer season (June 21st) and the demand for water will continue to rise. Therefore, the Stage 1 Water Conservation Alert will remain in force. The conservation measures that customers have made voluntarily have had an impact in reducing water demands and we will need to continue these measures into the summer months. Please continue to use water wisely. We request that you continue to irrigate during off-peak time periods according to the schedule below. If you have a water-intensive activity (power-washing, topping off swimming pools) please do these during off-peak hours or schedule during overcast, rainy days when water demand is typically less. If there is a significant increase in water demand requiring amplified attention, we will provide notification through the media, our Web site, and by sending emergency messages via telephone. Additional information can be found at <http://www.brunswickcountync.gov/> or by calling 910-253-2657.

Under a Stage 1 Water Alert, water system customers are requested to make voluntary adjustments
as follows:

1. Defer all non-essential water use to outside the peak demand hours of 5:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m; preferably after nightfall.
2. Don’t overwater your yard. One inch of water per week in the summer will keep most types of grass healthy. To determine how long you need to run your sprinkler to provide 1” of water, place straight edged cans at different distances from your sprinkler and time how long it takes to fill an average of 1” of water in each can. Water occasionally, but deeply to encourage deeper rooting that makes grass more drought/heat tolerant.
3. Install rain shut-off devices on automatic sprinkler systems.
4. Don’t water pavement and impervious surfaces.
5. Use the following recommended irrigation schedule to even out system demands:
a. Odd address numbers – Tuesday/Thursday/Saturday
b. Even address numbers – Wednesday/Friday/Sunday
c. No irrigation on Mondays
6. Limit lawn watering to that necessary for plant survival. Water lawns outside of the peak demand hours of 5:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m; preferably after nightfall.
7. Water shrubbery the minimum required. Water shrubbery outside of the peak demand hours of 5:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. Use drip irrigation systems in shrubbery beds and around trees to prevent water loss through evaporation.
8. Use abundant mulch around trees and shrubs to retain moisture.
9. Plant drought-tolerant grasses, trees, and plants.
10. Adjust mower height to a higher setting to retain moisture.
11. Limit the use of clothes washers and dishwashers and when used, operate fully loaded. Operate dishwashers outside of the peak demand hours of 5:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m; preferably after nightfall.
12. Limit vehicle washing to a minimum. Use commercial car washes that recycle water.
13. Use shower for bathing rather than bathtub and limit shower to no more than five (5) minutes.
14. Inspect and repair all faulty and defective parts of faucets and toilets. Pay attention to dripping sounds.
15. Do not leave faucets running while shaving, brushing teeth, rinsing or preparing food.
16. Do not wash down outside areas such as sidewalks, driveways, patios, etc.
17. Install water-saving showerheads and other water conservation devices.
18. Install water-saving devices in toilets such as early closing flappers.
19. Limit hours of water-cooled air conditioners.
20. Keep drinking water in a container in the refrigerator instead of running water from a faucet until it is cool.
21. Do not fill new (or empty) swimming or wading pools. Top off existing swimming pools from dusk until dawn.
22. Cover pool and spas when not in use to prevent evaporation.
23. Use disposable and biodegradable dishes where possible.

All customers of a public water system anywhere in Brunswick County are affected by Water Conservation Alerts. Brunswick County Public Utilities provides water service in unincorporated portions of Brunswick County as well as the following communities: Boiling Spring Lakes, Bolivia, Calabash, Carolina Shores, Caswell Beach, Sandy Creek, St. James, Sunset Beach, and Varnamtown. Customers of other utilities such as Bald Head Island, Brunswick Regional – H2GO (Belville), Holden Beach, Leland, Navassa, Northwest, Oak Island, Ocean Isle Beach, Shallotte, and Southport are under the same restrictions since these utilities receive their water from Brunswick County Public Utilities.

Please note that this Stage 1 Water Conservation Alert does not affect the use of private groundwater wells or those using highly treated reclaimed wastewater. (St. James, Winding River, Sea Trail, and Sandpiper Bay golf courses use reclaimed water. Other golf courses use wells and ponds for irrigation.) Also, this is not a water quality advisory; this is a water conservation advisory. There is no need to boil water for potable use unless you receive a Low Pressure Advisory notice for your specific area due to other conditions in the water distribution system.

Residents will be notified if any other conservation measures are needed and when conditions dictate that restrictions are no longer required. Residents who have questions should contact their water service provider directly or Brunswick County Public Utilities at 910-253-2657. Additional information can be found at <http://www.brunswickcountync.gov/>.

http://www.brunswickcountync.gov/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/smart-tips-for-the-home-yard.pdf

http://www.brunswickcountync.gov/files/utilities/2015/02/util_water_conservation_utilities_brochure.pdf

– End –

Update – Stage 1 – Water Conservation Alert – Reminder

06.13.2019
UPDATE – Stage 1 – Water Conservation Alert – Reminder

A Stage 1 Water Conservation Alert is still in place for all customers of any Brunswick County public water system.

Although there has been some relief, hot, dry conditions are expected to return as we get into the summer season and the demand for water will continue to rise. Recent rainfall and voluntary conservation efforts have reduced system demand; still Brunswick County has yet to reach its peak demand period associated with the July 4th holiday.

We will continue to assess the need for the Water Conservation Alert as the summer season progresses.

Thank you for your continued efforts to conserve water and to use it wisely.
– End –

Brunswick County Files Legal Action Against DuPont and Chemours for Contaminating the Cape Fear River

10.31.2017
Statement from Brunswick County

Bolivia, NC – The filing of formal legal action against Chemours and DuPont represents another crucial step in protecting our public drinking water supply. It sends a clear message that Brunswick County will simply not stand for the discharge of emerging or unregulated chemicals into our public drinking water supply. Let us be clear…we will ensure that any company that threatens this vital resource is held responsible. Furthermore, our litigation team is consulting the nation’s leading experts to determine the best long-term water testing and treatment methods for the entire county. As part of that, we will ensure that the costs for doing so do not fall upon the rate payers, but upon those dumping the unregulated chemicals in the water.


Top environmental attorneys with Baron & Budd and Seagle Law represent North Carolina county in lawsuit against chemical companies

DALLAS – Oct. 31, 2017 – Today, Brunswick County, North Carolina, took the first important step of addressing the long term contamination of the Cape Fear River by DuPont and Chemours. The national law firm of Baron & Budd announced today that it has filed suit on behalf of Brunswick County in the United States Eastern District of North Carolina against Chemours and DuPont for their role in contaminating the Cape Fear River. The firm is pursuing legal action on the County’s behalf to recover costs required to investigate, manage, reduce and remove chemicals from drinking water drawn from the Cape Fear River. Harold Seagle of North Carolina-based Seagle Law will serve as co-counsel in the case.

Through initial investigations, Brunswick County has obtained evidence that Chemours and DuPont not only manufactured dangerous perfluorinated chemicals (“PFCs”) at the Fayetteville Works plant in Fayetteville, North Carolina since 1980, but also released PFC chemicals into the Cape Fear River over the span of many years without disclosure. The companies have continued to deposit PFCs into the river as recently as September 2017.

The legal team representing Brunswick County will be led by Baron & Budd Shareholder Scott Summy, one of the most successful water contamination litigators in the U.S. Summy and the Baron & Budd team have won over $1 billion for clients facing water contamination issues. Summy also brings a lengthy track record of protecting the drinking water of North Carolina residents. In the 1990s, he filed the first MTBE lawsuit against Conoco on behalf of Wilmington residents, which was settled in 1997 after a Wilmington-based jury rendered a multi-million-dollar verdict to cover the costs of medical monitoring.

DuPont is the fourth largest chemical company in the world based on market capitalization as of 2017, and is ranked No. 117 on the 2017 Fortune 500 list. The Chemours Company was spun off by DuPont in 2015, and today, it is a publicly-traded Fortune 500 Company, listed on the New York Stock Exchange.

“To think that DuPont and Chemours released their waste products directly into the Cape Fear River, which it knew was public drinking water for thousands of people, is unimaginable,” said Summy. “The unfortunate challenge now facing Brunswick County is contaminated drinking water caused by the non-disclosed deposit of PFCs into the Cape Fear River. The County is dedicated to ensuring its residents’ safety and quality of life are protected, which is why it has filed a lawsuit to resolve this situation.”

ABOUT BARON & BUDD, P.C.

The law firm of Baron & Budd, P.C., with offices in Dallas, Baton Rouge, New Orleans, Austin, Los Angeles, and San Diego, is a nationally recognized law firm with a nearly 40-year history of “Protecting What’s Right” for people, communities and businesses harmed by negligence. Baron & Budd’s size and resources enable the firm to take on large and complex cases. The firm represents individuals and government and business entities in areas as diverse as dangerous pharmaceuticals and medical devices, environmental contamination, the Gulf oil spill, financial fraud, overtime violations, deceptive advertising, automotive defects, trucking accidents, nursing home abuse, and asbestos-related illnesses such as mesothelioma.


Lawsuit FAQ

Who benefits from the lawsuit that Brunswick County filed against Chemours and DuPont?

  • Brunswick County Public Utilities customers will benefit from the lawsuit. It is protecting these customers’ interests and needs.

Why did Brunswick County file a lawsuit against Chemours and DuPont?

  • Brunswick County filed suit against Chemours and DuPont to protect Brunswick County Utilities customers and their long-term water needs. State officials have not advised the County to take protective measures regarding drinking the water. Brunswick County continues to test the water weekly, and the levels of chemicals found continue to be below health goals issued by the State. The lawsuit is looking at the interests of Brunswick County’s customers in the long run and protecting customers against new and emerging chemical compounds.