Public Notice

Public Notice

Information About New Flood Maps and Flood Ordinance Changes

06.13.2018

Brunswick County is considering adopting new flood maps and amending the County’s Flood Damage Prevention Ordinance, to participate in the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP).

FEMA regularly updates Flood Insurance Rate Maps (FIRMs) using studies to improve the maps and ensure their accuracy. The last maps FEMA approved for our area were adopted in 2006; since then, FEMA has worked to study and improve these maps. Now that FEMA has approved updated maps, Brunswick County can adopt them and continue to participate in the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP).

To view the current effective maps or the preliminary maps on the State’s website, visit the Flood Risk Information System (FRIS) – Flood Maps, which will automatically show the current effective maps. To view the preliminary maps, in the top right corner of the page, click on “Effective” and change to “Preliminary.” This will allow the viewer to see the maps being adopted on August 28, 2018.

Brunswick County will be scheduling a public hearing about these changes, and a public informational workshop will be held on July 10, 2018 at 6 p.m. in the County Commissioners Chambers, at 30 Government Center Drive in Bolivia, NC.

For more information about the proposed changes to the Flood Maps and the Flood Damage Prevention Ordinance, click here.

Extreme Heat

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Extreme Heat Emergency

Temperatures that hover 10 degrees or more above the average high temperature for the region and last for several weeks are defined as extreme heat.

Humid or muggy conditions, which add to the discomfort of high temperatures, occur when a “dome” of high atmospheric pressure traps hazy, damp air near the ground. Excessively dry and hot conditions can provoke dust storms and low visibility. Droughts occur when a long period passes without any substantial rainfall. A heat wave combined with a drought is a very dangerous situation.

  • Heat kills by pushing the human body beyond its limits. Under normal conditions, the body’s internal thermostat produces perspiration that evaporates and cools the body. However, in extreme heat and high humidity, evaporation is slowed and the body must work extra hard to maintain a normal temperature.
  • Most heat disorders occur because the victim has been overexposed to heat or has over exercised for his or her age and physical condition. Other conditions that can induce heat-related illnesses include stagnant atmospheric conditions and poor air quality.
  • A prolonged drought can have a serious economic impact on a community. Increased demand for water and electricity may result in shortages of resources. Moreover, food shortages may occur if agricultural production is damaged or destroyed by a loss of crops or livestock.

More Information

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Contact

3325 OLD OCEAN HIGHWAY
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(910) 253-5383
emergency.services@brunswickcountync.gov
open mon-fri:
8:30 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.

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