Public Notice

Public Notice

Information About New Flood Maps and Flood Ordinance Changes

06.13.2018

Brunswick County is considering adopting new flood maps and amending the County’s Flood Damage Prevention Ordinance, to participate in the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP).

FEMA regularly updates Flood Insurance Rate Maps (FIRMs) using studies to improve the maps and ensure their accuracy. The last maps FEMA approved for our area were adopted in 2006; since then, FEMA has worked to study and improve these maps. Now that FEMA has approved updated maps, Brunswick County can adopt them and continue to participate in the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP).

To view the current effective maps or the preliminary maps on the State’s website, visit the Flood Risk Information System (FRIS) – Flood Maps, which will automatically show the current effective maps. To view the preliminary maps, in the top right corner of the page, click on “Effective” and change to “Preliminary.” This will allow the viewer to see the maps being adopted on August 28, 2018.

Brunswick County will be scheduling a public hearing about these changes, and a public informational workshop will be held on July 10, 2018 at 6 p.m. in the County Commissioners Chambers, at 30 Government Center Drive in Bolivia, NC.

For more information about the proposed changes to the Flood Maps and the Flood Damage Prevention Ordinance, click here.

Before a Tornado

Tornado Preparation

Conduct tornado drills each tornado season

Designate an area in the home as a shelter, and practice having everyone in the family go there in response to a tornado threat.

Discuss with family members the difference between a “tornado watch” and a “tornado warning.”

Have disaster supplies on hand

  • Flashlight and extra batteries
  • Portable, battery-operated radio and extra batteries
  • First aid kit and manual
  • Emergency food and water
  • Nonelectric can opener
  • Essential medicines
  • Cash and credit cards
  • Sturdy shoes

Develop an emergency communication plan

In case family members are separated from one another during a tornado (a real possibility during the day when adults are at work and children are at school), have a plan for getting back together.

Ask an out-of-state relative or friend to serve as the family contact. After a disaster, it’s often easier to call long distance. Make sure everyone in the family knows the name, address, and phone number of the contact person.

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