Public Notice

Public Notice

Stage 1 – Water Conservation Alert

05.28.2019

Bolivia, NC – Brunswick County thanks the users of public water systems throughout the county for using water wisely over the Memorial Day weekend and asks public water system users to continue to be diligent in using water wisely. Drought conditions are expected to continue for the foreseeable weather forecast and water demands are expected to increase as vacationers visit Brunswick County beaches. Demand for water over the Memorial Day weekend exceeded 90% of the available production and distribution capacity. To ensure adequate water is available for essential needs, Brunswick County has declared a Stage 1 Water Conservation Alert effective immediately. All customers of a public water system anywhere in Brunswick County are affected by Water Conservation Alerts. Brunswick County Public Utilities provides water service in unincorporated portions of Brunswick County as well as the following communities: Boiling Spring Lakes, Bolivia, Calabash, Carolina Shores, Caswell Beach, Sandy Creek, St. James, Sunset Beach, and Varnamtown. Customers of other utilities such as Bald Head Island, Brunswick Regional – H2GO (Belville), Holden Beach, Leland, Navassa, Northwest, Oak Island, Ocean Isle Beach, Shallotte, and Southport are under the same restrictions since these utilities receive their water from Brunswick County Public Utilities.

Under a Stage 1 Water Alert, water system customers are requested to make voluntary adjustments to their water usage habits to appreciably reduce peak demands. (A peak demand of 80% of system production and distribution capacity being targeted). Irrigation demands represent the bulk of non-essential water use, so a primary way that customers may reduce water usage is to limit irrigation. A unified application of voluntary water reductions by all water system users in Brunswick County may help to avoid mandatory water restrictions in the event drought conditions do not lessen.

Specific ways to reduce water usage are as follows:
1. Defer all non-essential water use to outside the peak demand hours of 5:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m; preferably after nightfall.
2. Don’t overwater your yard. One inch of water per week in the summer will keep most types of grass healthy. To determine how long you need to run your sprinkler to provide 1” of water, place straight edged cans at different distances from your sprinkler and time how long it takes to fill an average of 1” of water in each can. Water occasionally, but deeply to encourage deeper rooting that makes grass more drought/heat tolerant.
3. Install rain shut-off devices on automatic sprinkler systems.
4. Don’t water pavement and impervious surfaces.
5. Use the following recommended irrigation schedule to even out system demands:
a. Odd address numbers – Tuesday/Thursday/Saturday
b. Even address numbers – Wednesday/Friday/Sunday
c. No irrigation on Mondays
6. Limit lawn watering to that necessary for plant survival. Water lawns outside of the peak demand hours of 5:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m; preferably after nightfall.
7. Water shrubbery the minimum required. Water shrubbery outside of the peak demand hours of 5:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. Use drip irrigation systems in shrubbery beds and around trees to prevent water loss through evaporation.
8. Use abundant mulch around trees and shrubs to retain moisture.
9. Plant drought-tolerant grasses, trees, and plants.
10. Adjust mower height to a higher setting to retain moisture.
11. Limit the use of clothes washers and dishwashers and when used, operate fully loaded. Operate dishwashers outside of the peak demand hours of 5:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m; preferably after nightfall.
12. Limit vehicle washing to a minimum. Use commercial car washes that recycle water.
13. Use shower for bathing rather than bathtub and limit shower to no more than five (5) minutes.
14. Inspect and repair all faulty and defective parts of faucets and toilets. Pay attention to dripping sounds.
15. Do not leave faucets running while shaving, brushing teeth, rinsing or preparing food.
16. Do not wash down outside areas such as sidewalks, driveways, patios, etc.
17. Install water-saving showerheads and other water conservation devices.
18. Install water-saving devices in toilets such as early closing flappers.
19. Limit hours of water-cooled air conditioners.
20. Keep drinking water in a container in the refrigerator instead of running water from a faucet until it is cool.
21. Do not fill new (or empty) swimming or wading pools. Top off existing swimming pools from dusk until dawn.
22. Cover pool and spas when not in use to prevent evaporation.
23. Use disposable and biodegradable dishes where possible.

Please note that this Stage 1 Water Conservation Alert does not affect the use of private groundwater wells or those using highly treated reclaimed wastewater. (St. James, Winding River, Sea Trail, and Sandpiper Bay golf courses use reclaimed water. Other golf courses use wells and ponds for irrigation.) Also, this is not a water quality advisory; this is a water conservation advisory. There is no need to boil water for potable use unless you receive a Low Pressure Advisory notice for your specific area due to other conditions in the water distribution system.

Residents will be notified if any other conservation measures are needed and when conditions dictate that restrictions are no longer required. Residents who have questions should contact their water service provider directly or Brunswick County Public Utilities at 910-253-2657. Additional information can be found at

http://www.brunswickcountync.gov/files/utilities/2015/02/util_water_conservation_utilities_brochure.pdf

http://www.brunswickcountync.gov/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/smart-tips-for-the-home-yard.pdf

– End –

UPDATE – Stage 1 – Water Conservation Alert – UPDATE

06.06.2019

UPDATE – Stage 1 – Water Conservation Alert – UPDATE

Bolivia, NC – A Stage 1 Water Conservation Alert was instituted for all customers of any Brunswick County public water system on May 28, 2019, due to record water demand caused by excessive temperatures, lack of rain, and an increased number of visitors to Brunswick County. As a result of customers’ voluntary conservation measures combined with a break in the drought conditions, water demand has been reduced to more manageable levels. We thank you for your efforts to conserve water and to use it wisely. Although there has been some relief in the past week, hot, dry conditions are expected to return as we get into the summer season (June 21st) and the demand for water will continue to rise. Therefore, the Stage 1 Water Conservation Alert will remain in force. The conservation measures that customers have made voluntarily have had an impact in reducing water demands and we will need to continue these measures into the summer months. Please continue to use water wisely. We request that you continue to irrigate during off-peak time periods according to the schedule below. If you have a water-intensive activity (power-washing, topping off swimming pools) please do these during off-peak hours or schedule during overcast, rainy days when water demand is typically less. If there is a significant increase in water demand requiring amplified attention, we will provide notification through the media, our Web site, and by sending emergency messages via telephone. Additional information can be found at <http://www.brunswickcountync.gov/> or by calling 910-253-2657.

Under a Stage 1 Water Alert, water system customers are requested to make voluntary adjustments
as follows:

1. Defer all non-essential water use to outside the peak demand hours of 5:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m; preferably after nightfall.
2. Don’t overwater your yard. One inch of water per week in the summer will keep most types of grass healthy. To determine how long you need to run your sprinkler to provide 1” of water, place straight edged cans at different distances from your sprinkler and time how long it takes to fill an average of 1” of water in each can. Water occasionally, but deeply to encourage deeper rooting that makes grass more drought/heat tolerant.
3. Install rain shut-off devices on automatic sprinkler systems.
4. Don’t water pavement and impervious surfaces.
5. Use the following recommended irrigation schedule to even out system demands:
a. Odd address numbers – Tuesday/Thursday/Saturday
b. Even address numbers – Wednesday/Friday/Sunday
c. No irrigation on Mondays
6. Limit lawn watering to that necessary for plant survival. Water lawns outside of the peak demand hours of 5:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m; preferably after nightfall.
7. Water shrubbery the minimum required. Water shrubbery outside of the peak demand hours of 5:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. Use drip irrigation systems in shrubbery beds and around trees to prevent water loss through evaporation.
8. Use abundant mulch around trees and shrubs to retain moisture.
9. Plant drought-tolerant grasses, trees, and plants.
10. Adjust mower height to a higher setting to retain moisture.
11. Limit the use of clothes washers and dishwashers and when used, operate fully loaded. Operate dishwashers outside of the peak demand hours of 5:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m; preferably after nightfall.
12. Limit vehicle washing to a minimum. Use commercial car washes that recycle water.
13. Use shower for bathing rather than bathtub and limit shower to no more than five (5) minutes.
14. Inspect and repair all faulty and defective parts of faucets and toilets. Pay attention to dripping sounds.
15. Do not leave faucets running while shaving, brushing teeth, rinsing or preparing food.
16. Do not wash down outside areas such as sidewalks, driveways, patios, etc.
17. Install water-saving showerheads and other water conservation devices.
18. Install water-saving devices in toilets such as early closing flappers.
19. Limit hours of water-cooled air conditioners.
20. Keep drinking water in a container in the refrigerator instead of running water from a faucet until it is cool.
21. Do not fill new (or empty) swimming or wading pools. Top off existing swimming pools from dusk until dawn.
22. Cover pool and spas when not in use to prevent evaporation.
23. Use disposable and biodegradable dishes where possible.

All customers of a public water system anywhere in Brunswick County are affected by Water Conservation Alerts. Brunswick County Public Utilities provides water service in unincorporated portions of Brunswick County as well as the following communities: Boiling Spring Lakes, Bolivia, Calabash, Carolina Shores, Caswell Beach, Sandy Creek, St. James, Sunset Beach, and Varnamtown. Customers of other utilities such as Bald Head Island, Brunswick Regional – H2GO (Belville), Holden Beach, Leland, Navassa, Northwest, Oak Island, Ocean Isle Beach, Shallotte, and Southport are under the same restrictions since these utilities receive their water from Brunswick County Public Utilities.

Please note that this Stage 1 Water Conservation Alert does not affect the use of private groundwater wells or those using highly treated reclaimed wastewater. (St. James, Winding River, Sea Trail, and Sandpiper Bay golf courses use reclaimed water. Other golf courses use wells and ponds for irrigation.) Also, this is not a water quality advisory; this is a water conservation advisory. There is no need to boil water for potable use unless you receive a Low Pressure Advisory notice for your specific area due to other conditions in the water distribution system.

Residents will be notified if any other conservation measures are needed and when conditions dictate that restrictions are no longer required. Residents who have questions should contact their water service provider directly or Brunswick County Public Utilities at 910-253-2657. Additional information can be found at <http://www.brunswickcountync.gov/>.

http://www.brunswickcountync.gov/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/smart-tips-for-the-home-yard.pdf

http://www.brunswickcountync.gov/files/utilities/2015/02/util_water_conservation_utilities_brochure.pdf

– End –

Update – Stage 1 – Water Conservation Alert – Reminder

06.13.2019
UPDATE – Stage 1 – Water Conservation Alert – Reminder

A Stage 1 Water Conservation Alert is still in place for all customers of any Brunswick County public water system.

Although there has been some relief, hot, dry conditions are expected to return as we get into the summer season and the demand for water will continue to rise. Recent rainfall and voluntary conservation efforts have reduced system demand; still Brunswick County has yet to reach its peak demand period associated with the July 4th holiday.

We will continue to assess the need for the Water Conservation Alert as the summer season progresses.

Thank you for your continued efforts to conserve water and to use it wisely.
– End –

Flu Shots and Information

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Immunizations

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Flu Clinic

Brunswick County Health Services will begin offering flu vaccines on Oct. 1. Nurses will also be administering flu shots at Brunswick County Schools and various locations throughout the community this season.

It is estimated that each year approximately 5 percent to 20 percent of U.S. residents get the flu, and more than 200,000 individuals are hospitalized for flu-related complications. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends annual flu vaccinations for everyone six months of age and older. Children younger than five years old and adults 65 years old or older, pregnant women, and people with underlying medical conditions are all at increased risk of severe illness or complications from the flu.

The single best way to help prevent vaccine preventable diseases is to get vaccinated. To help prevent the spread of influenza and other viruses, everyone should cover his or her nose and mouth when coughing or sneezing, and promptly dispose of the tissue in a trash can. If tissues are not available, people should cough or sneeze into their upper sleeves, instead of their bare hands. Hands should be washed frequently with warm, soapy water for 10-15 seconds, or cleaned with hand sanitizer when water is not available. Household areas should be cleaned with household detergents, such as bleach or alcohol when appropriate, to keep them sanitized. Avoiding crowds, limiting travel and working from home when possible can all also help prevent the spread of illness.

“It’s the most important thing you can do to protect both yourself and your family from the flu,” said Health and Human Services Executive Director David Stanley.

The flu shot clinic will begin on Oct. 1 at Brunswick County Health Services Monday through Friday, from 9 a.m. until noon and 1 p.m. until 4 p.m. No appointment is needed. Regular flu shots are $40 while the high-dose vaccine, recommended for people 65 years old or older, is $59. Health Services accepts cash, checks, credit cards, Medicaid, Medicare, Aetna, Blue Cross Blue Shield, Cigna, Medcost, Tricare and United Healthcare.

Vaccines will be administered to students at Brunswick County Schools on selected dates. Parents must complete permission forms before the vaccination can be given.

For more information, contact Health Services at 910-253-2250.

How Flu Spreads

Person to Person

People with flu can spread it to others up to about 6 feet away. Most experts think that flu viruses spread mainly by droplets made when people with flu cough, sneeze or talk. These droplets can land in the mouths or noses of people who are nearby or possibly be inhaled into the lungs. Less often, a person might get flu by touching a surface or object that has flu virus on it and then touching their own mouth, nose, or possibly their eyes.

When Flu Spreads

People with flu are most contagious in the first three to four days after their illness begins.  Most healthy adults may be able to infect others beginning 1 day before symptoms develop and up to 5 to 7 days after becoming sick. Children and some people with weakened immune systems may  pass the virus for longer than 7 days.

Symptoms can begin about 2 days (but can range from 1 to 4 days)  after the virus enters the body. That means that you may be able to pass on the flu to someone else before you know you are sick, as well as while you are sick. Some people can be infected with the flu virus but have no symptoms. During this time, those people may still spread the virus to others.

Content provided and maintained by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Please see our system usage guidelines and disclaimer.
How to Prevent Flu

Flu is a serious contagious disease that can lead to hospitalization and even death. 

CDC urges you to take the following actions to protect yourself and others from influenza (the flu): 

Step One

Take time to get a flu vaccine.(https://www.cdc.gov/flu/protect/vaccine/index.htm)

Infographic: Get yourself and your family vaccinated!

Step Two

Take everyday preventive actions to stop the spread of germs.(https://www.cdc.gov/flu/protect/habits/index.htm)

Infographic: Take everyday preventative actions to help stop the spread of flu viruses!

  • Try to avoid close contact with sick people.
  • While sick, limit contact with others as much as possible to keep from infecting them.
  • If you are sick with flu symptoms, CDC recommends that you stay home for at least 24 hours after your fever is gone except to get medical care or for other necessities. (Your fever should be gone for 24 hours without the use of a fever-reducing medicine.)
  • Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze. Throw the tissue in the trash after you use it.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand rub.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth. Germs spread this way.
  • Clean and disinfect surfaces and objects that may be contaminated with germs like the flu.
  • See Everyday Preventive Actions[257 KB, 2 Pages](https://www.cdc.gov/flu/pdf/freeresources/updated/everyday-preventive-actions-8.5×11.pdf) and Nonpharmaceutical Interventions (NPIs) for more information about actions – apart from getting vaccinated and taking medicine – that people and communities can take to help slow the spread of illnesses like influenza (flu).

Step 3

Take flu antiviral drugs if your doctor prescribes them.(https://www.cdc.gov/flu/antivirals/index.htm)

Infographic: Take antiviral drugs if your doctor prescribes them!

Visit CDC’s website to find out what to do if you get sick with the flu(https://www.cdc.gov/flu/takingcare.htm).

Key Facts About Flu Vaccines

Why should people get vaccinated against the flu?

Influenza is a potentially serious disease that can lead to hospitalization and sometimes even death. Every flu season is different, and influenza infection can affect people differently, but millions of people get the flu every year, hundreds of thousands of people are hospitalized and thousands or tens of thousands of people die from flu-related causes every year. An annual seasonal flu vaccine is the best way to help protect against flu. Vaccination has been shown to have many benefits(https://www.cdc.gov/flu/protect/keyfacts.htm#benefits) including reducing the risk of flu illnesses, hospitalizations and even the risk of flu-related death in children.

How do flu vaccines work?

Flu vaccines cause antibodies to develop in the body about two weeks after vaccination. These antibodies provide protection against infection with the viruses that are in the vaccine.

The seasonal flu vaccine protects against the influenza viruses that research indicates will be most common during the upcoming season. Traditional flu vaccines (called “trivalent” vaccines) are made to protect against three flu viruses; an influenza A (H1N1) virus, an influenza A (H3N2) virus, and an influenza B virus. There are also flu vaccines made to protect against four flu viruses (called “quadrivalent” vaccines). These vaccines protect against the same viruses as the trivalent vaccine and an additional B virus.

Why do I need a flu vaccine every year?

A flu vaccine is needed every season for two reasons. First, the body’s immune response from vaccination declines over time, so an annual vaccine is needed for optimal protection. Second, because flu viruses are constantly changing, the formulation of the flu vaccine is reviewed each year and updated as needed to keep up with changing flu viruses. For the best protection, everyone 6 months and older should get vaccinated annually.

Does flu vaccine work right away?

No. It takes about two weeks after vaccination for antibodies to develop in the body and provide protection against influenza virus infection. That’s why it’s better to get vaccinated by the end of October, before the flu season really gets under way.

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MAILING ADDRESS: PO BOX 9
BOLIVIA NC, 28422

(910) 253-2250
(888) 428-4429
HEALTH@BRUNSWICKCOUNTYNC.GOV
open mon-fri:
8:30 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.

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