Public Notice

Public Notice

Stage 1 – Water Conservation Alert

05.28.2019

Bolivia, NC – Brunswick County thanks the users of public water systems throughout the county for using water wisely over the Memorial Day weekend and asks public water system users to continue to be diligent in using water wisely. Drought conditions are expected to continue for the foreseeable weather forecast and water demands are expected to increase as vacationers visit Brunswick County beaches. Demand for water over the Memorial Day weekend exceeded 90% of the available production and distribution capacity. To ensure adequate water is available for essential needs, Brunswick County has declared a Stage 1 Water Conservation Alert effective immediately. All customers of a public water system anywhere in Brunswick County are affected by Water Conservation Alerts. Brunswick County Public Utilities provides water service in unincorporated portions of Brunswick County as well as the following communities: Boiling Spring Lakes, Bolivia, Calabash, Carolina Shores, Caswell Beach, Sandy Creek, St. James, Sunset Beach, and Varnamtown. Customers of other utilities such as Bald Head Island, Brunswick Regional – H2GO (Belville), Holden Beach, Leland, Navassa, Northwest, Oak Island, Ocean Isle Beach, Shallotte, and Southport are under the same restrictions since these utilities receive their water from Brunswick County Public Utilities.

Under a Stage 1 Water Alert, water system customers are requested to make voluntary adjustments to their water usage habits to appreciably reduce peak demands. (A peak demand of 80% of system production and distribution capacity being targeted). Irrigation demands represent the bulk of non-essential water use, so a primary way that customers may reduce water usage is to limit irrigation. A unified application of voluntary water reductions by all water system users in Brunswick County may help to avoid mandatory water restrictions in the event drought conditions do not lessen.

Specific ways to reduce water usage are as follows:
1. Defer all non-essential water use to outside the peak demand hours of 5:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m; preferably after nightfall.
2. Don’t overwater your yard. One inch of water per week in the summer will keep most types of grass healthy. To determine how long you need to run your sprinkler to provide 1” of water, place straight edged cans at different distances from your sprinkler and time how long it takes to fill an average of 1” of water in each can. Water occasionally, but deeply to encourage deeper rooting that makes grass more drought/heat tolerant.
3. Install rain shut-off devices on automatic sprinkler systems.
4. Don’t water pavement and impervious surfaces.
5. Use the following recommended irrigation schedule to even out system demands:
a. Odd address numbers – Tuesday/Thursday/Saturday
b. Even address numbers – Wednesday/Friday/Sunday
c. No irrigation on Mondays
6. Limit lawn watering to that necessary for plant survival. Water lawns outside of the peak demand hours of 5:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m; preferably after nightfall.
7. Water shrubbery the minimum required. Water shrubbery outside of the peak demand hours of 5:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. Use drip irrigation systems in shrubbery beds and around trees to prevent water loss through evaporation.
8. Use abundant mulch around trees and shrubs to retain moisture.
9. Plant drought-tolerant grasses, trees, and plants.
10. Adjust mower height to a higher setting to retain moisture.
11. Limit the use of clothes washers and dishwashers and when used, operate fully loaded. Operate dishwashers outside of the peak demand hours of 5:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m; preferably after nightfall.
12. Limit vehicle washing to a minimum. Use commercial car washes that recycle water.
13. Use shower for bathing rather than bathtub and limit shower to no more than five (5) minutes.
14. Inspect and repair all faulty and defective parts of faucets and toilets. Pay attention to dripping sounds.
15. Do not leave faucets running while shaving, brushing teeth, rinsing or preparing food.
16. Do not wash down outside areas such as sidewalks, driveways, patios, etc.
17. Install water-saving showerheads and other water conservation devices.
18. Install water-saving devices in toilets such as early closing flappers.
19. Limit hours of water-cooled air conditioners.
20. Keep drinking water in a container in the refrigerator instead of running water from a faucet until it is cool.
21. Do not fill new (or empty) swimming or wading pools. Top off existing swimming pools from dusk until dawn.
22. Cover pool and spas when not in use to prevent evaporation.
23. Use disposable and biodegradable dishes where possible.

Please note that this Stage 1 Water Conservation Alert does not affect the use of private groundwater wells or those using highly treated reclaimed wastewater. (St. James, Winding River, Sea Trail, and Sandpiper Bay golf courses use reclaimed water. Other golf courses use wells and ponds for irrigation.) Also, this is not a water quality advisory; this is a water conservation advisory. There is no need to boil water for potable use unless you receive a Low Pressure Advisory notice for your specific area due to other conditions in the water distribution system.

Residents will be notified if any other conservation measures are needed and when conditions dictate that restrictions are no longer required. Residents who have questions should contact their water service provider directly or Brunswick County Public Utilities at 910-253-2657. Additional information can be found at

http://www.brunswickcountync.gov/files/utilities/2015/02/util_water_conservation_utilities_brochure.pdf

http://www.brunswickcountync.gov/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/smart-tips-for-the-home-yard.pdf

– End –

UPDATE – Stage 1 – Water Conservation Alert – UPDATE

06.06.2019

UPDATE – Stage 1 – Water Conservation Alert – UPDATE

Bolivia, NC – A Stage 1 Water Conservation Alert was instituted for all customers of any Brunswick County public water system on May 28, 2019, due to record water demand caused by excessive temperatures, lack of rain, and an increased number of visitors to Brunswick County. As a result of customers’ voluntary conservation measures combined with a break in the drought conditions, water demand has been reduced to more manageable levels. We thank you for your efforts to conserve water and to use it wisely. Although there has been some relief in the past week, hot, dry conditions are expected to return as we get into the summer season (June 21st) and the demand for water will continue to rise. Therefore, the Stage 1 Water Conservation Alert will remain in force. The conservation measures that customers have made voluntarily have had an impact in reducing water demands and we will need to continue these measures into the summer months. Please continue to use water wisely. We request that you continue to irrigate during off-peak time periods according to the schedule below. If you have a water-intensive activity (power-washing, topping off swimming pools) please do these during off-peak hours or schedule during overcast, rainy days when water demand is typically less. If there is a significant increase in water demand requiring amplified attention, we will provide notification through the media, our Web site, and by sending emergency messages via telephone. Additional information can be found at <http://www.brunswickcountync.gov/> or by calling 910-253-2657.

Under a Stage 1 Water Alert, water system customers are requested to make voluntary adjustments
as follows:

1. Defer all non-essential water use to outside the peak demand hours of 5:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m; preferably after nightfall.
2. Don’t overwater your yard. One inch of water per week in the summer will keep most types of grass healthy. To determine how long you need to run your sprinkler to provide 1” of water, place straight edged cans at different distances from your sprinkler and time how long it takes to fill an average of 1” of water in each can. Water occasionally, but deeply to encourage deeper rooting that makes grass more drought/heat tolerant.
3. Install rain shut-off devices on automatic sprinkler systems.
4. Don’t water pavement and impervious surfaces.
5. Use the following recommended irrigation schedule to even out system demands:
a. Odd address numbers – Tuesday/Thursday/Saturday
b. Even address numbers – Wednesday/Friday/Sunday
c. No irrigation on Mondays
6. Limit lawn watering to that necessary for plant survival. Water lawns outside of the peak demand hours of 5:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m; preferably after nightfall.
7. Water shrubbery the minimum required. Water shrubbery outside of the peak demand hours of 5:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. Use drip irrigation systems in shrubbery beds and around trees to prevent water loss through evaporation.
8. Use abundant mulch around trees and shrubs to retain moisture.
9. Plant drought-tolerant grasses, trees, and plants.
10. Adjust mower height to a higher setting to retain moisture.
11. Limit the use of clothes washers and dishwashers and when used, operate fully loaded. Operate dishwashers outside of the peak demand hours of 5:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m; preferably after nightfall.
12. Limit vehicle washing to a minimum. Use commercial car washes that recycle water.
13. Use shower for bathing rather than bathtub and limit shower to no more than five (5) minutes.
14. Inspect and repair all faulty and defective parts of faucets and toilets. Pay attention to dripping sounds.
15. Do not leave faucets running while shaving, brushing teeth, rinsing or preparing food.
16. Do not wash down outside areas such as sidewalks, driveways, patios, etc.
17. Install water-saving showerheads and other water conservation devices.
18. Install water-saving devices in toilets such as early closing flappers.
19. Limit hours of water-cooled air conditioners.
20. Keep drinking water in a container in the refrigerator instead of running water from a faucet until it is cool.
21. Do not fill new (or empty) swimming or wading pools. Top off existing swimming pools from dusk until dawn.
22. Cover pool and spas when not in use to prevent evaporation.
23. Use disposable and biodegradable dishes where possible.

All customers of a public water system anywhere in Brunswick County are affected by Water Conservation Alerts. Brunswick County Public Utilities provides water service in unincorporated portions of Brunswick County as well as the following communities: Boiling Spring Lakes, Bolivia, Calabash, Carolina Shores, Caswell Beach, Sandy Creek, St. James, Sunset Beach, and Varnamtown. Customers of other utilities such as Bald Head Island, Brunswick Regional – H2GO (Belville), Holden Beach, Leland, Navassa, Northwest, Oak Island, Ocean Isle Beach, Shallotte, and Southport are under the same restrictions since these utilities receive their water from Brunswick County Public Utilities.

Please note that this Stage 1 Water Conservation Alert does not affect the use of private groundwater wells or those using highly treated reclaimed wastewater. (St. James, Winding River, Sea Trail, and Sandpiper Bay golf courses use reclaimed water. Other golf courses use wells and ponds for irrigation.) Also, this is not a water quality advisory; this is a water conservation advisory. There is no need to boil water for potable use unless you receive a Low Pressure Advisory notice for your specific area due to other conditions in the water distribution system.

Residents will be notified if any other conservation measures are needed and when conditions dictate that restrictions are no longer required. Residents who have questions should contact their water service provider directly or Brunswick County Public Utilities at 910-253-2657. Additional information can be found at <http://www.brunswickcountync.gov/>.

http://www.brunswickcountync.gov/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/smart-tips-for-the-home-yard.pdf

http://www.brunswickcountync.gov/files/utilities/2015/02/util_water_conservation_utilities_brochure.pdf

– End –

Update – Stage 1 – Water Conservation Alert – Reminder

06.13.2019
UPDATE – Stage 1 – Water Conservation Alert – Reminder

A Stage 1 Water Conservation Alert is still in place for all customers of any Brunswick County public water system.

Although there has been some relief, hot, dry conditions are expected to return as we get into the summer season and the demand for water will continue to rise. Recent rainfall and voluntary conservation efforts have reduced system demand; still Brunswick County has yet to reach its peak demand period associated with the July 4th holiday.

We will continue to assess the need for the Water Conservation Alert as the summer season progresses.

Thank you for your continued efforts to conserve water and to use it wisely.
– End –

Agent Orange Presumptive Conditions

Local Veterans Organizations

Column 1 CTA

Educational Assistance

Column 2 CTA

Medical Facilities

Column 3 CTA

Burial in VA National or NC State Veterans Cemeteries

Column 4 CTA

Agent Orange Presumptive Conditions

Below is the list of health conditions the VA recognizes as service-connected for Vietnam veterans based on exposure to Agent Orange or other herbicides.

  • AL Amyloidosis: A rare disease caused when an abnormal protein, amyloid, enters tissues or organs.
  • B Cell Leukemias:  There are several different types of lymphoid leukemias. (B-cell chronic Lymphocytic leukemia/small Lymphocytic lymphoma; Acute lymphoblastic leukemia, Mature B-cell type; B-cell prolymphocytic leukemia; Hairy cell leukemia) And, 14 kinds of lymphomas involving B-cells (Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma; Follicular lymphoma; Mucosa-associated lymphatic tissue lymphoma (MALT); Small cell lymphocytic lymphoma; Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL); Burkitt lymphoma; Mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma; Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia; Nodal marginal zone B-cell lymphoma (NMZL); Splenic marginal zone lymphoma (SMZL); Extranodal marginal zone B-cell lymphoma; Intravascular large B-cell lymphoma; Primary effusion lymphoma; & Lymphomatoid granulomatosis.
  • Chloracne: A skin condition that occurs soon after dioxin exposure and looks like common forms of acne seen in teenagers. The first sign may be excessive oiliness of the skin. This is accompanied or followed by numerous blackheads. In mild cases, the blackheads may be limited to the areas around the eyes extending to the temples. In more severe cases, blackheads may appear in many places, especially over the cheekbone and other facial areas, behind the ears, and along the arms. Under VA’s rating regulations, it must be at least 10% disabling within 1 year of exposure to Agent Orange.
  • Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia: A disease that progresses slowly with increasing production of excessive numbers of white blood cells.
  • Diabetes Mellitus (Type 2): A disease characterized by high blood sugar levels resulting from the body’s inability to respond properly to the hormone insulin.
  • Hodgkin’s Disease: A malignant lymphoma (cancer) characterized by progressive enlargement of the lymph nodes, liver, and spleen, and by progressive anemia.
  • Ischemic Heart Disease: (IHD) is a condition in which there is an inadequate supply of blood and oxygen to a portion of the myocardium; it typically occurs when there is an imbalance between myocardial oxygen supply & demand. It includes but is not limited to, acute, subacute, and old myocardial infarction; atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease including coronary artery disease (including coronary spasm) and coronary bypass surgery; & stable, unstable, and Prinzmetal’s angina. (It does NOT include hypertension or peripheral manifestations of arteriosclerosis such as peripheral vascular disease or stroke.)
  • Multiple Myeloma: A cancer of plasma cells, a type of white blood cell in bone marrow.
  • Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma: A group of malignant tumors (cancers) that affect the lymph glands and other lymphatic tissue. These tumors are relatively rare compared to other types of cancer, and although survival rates have improved during the past two decades, these diseases tend to be fatal.
  • Parkinson’s Disease: A motor system condition with symptoms that include trembling of the limbs and face and impaired balance.
  • Peripheral Neuropathy, Early-Onset: A nervous system condition that causes numbness, tingling, and motor weakness. This condition affects only the peripheral nervous system, that is, only the nervous system outside the brain and spinal cord. Under VA’s rating regulations, it must be at least 10% disabling within 1 year of exposure to Agent Orange.
  • Porphyria Cutanea Tarda: A disorder characterized by liver dysfunction and by thinning and blistering of the skin in sun-exposed areas. Under VA’s rating regulations, it must be at least 10% disabling within 1 year of exposure to Agent Orange.
  • Prostate Cancer: Cancer of the prostate; one of the most common cancers among men.
  • Respiratory Cancers: Cancers of the lung, larynx, trachea, and bronchus.
  • Soft Tissue Sarcoma (other than Osteosarcoma, Chondrosarcoma, Kaposi’s sarcoma, or Mesothelioma): A group of different types of cancers in body tissues such as muscle, fat, blood and lymph vessels, and connective tissues.

Conditions Recognized in Children of Vietnam Veterans

  • Spina bifida (except spina bifida occulta): A neural tube birth defect that results from the failure of the bony portion of the spine to close properly in the developing fetus during early pregnancy.
  • Certain other birth defects in the children of women Vietnam Veterans that served in Vietnam from February 28, 1961 to May 7, 1975. These conditions must have resulted in permanent physical or mental disability, must be due to the herbicide exposure, and not inherited.

Presumptive Locations for Agent Orange Exposure

Vietnam – on land or on the inland waterways of Vietnam from Jan. 9, 1962 to May 7,1975

Korea – served in a unit along the DMZ from April 1, 1968 to Aug. 31, 1971

Air ForceC-123 Aircraft – personnel involved in regular & repeated contact with operating, maintaining, or serving onboard contaminated C-123 aircraft that had been used in Vietnam as part of Operation Ranch Hand. This includes active duty AF & AF Reservists between 1969 to 1986.

Thailand Military Bases – Duty must have been on or near the perimeters of military bases in Thailand anytime between Feb. 28, 1961 to May 7, 1975. Service member must have provided perimeter security, such as an MP (military police).

Veterans must show factual basis that they were exposed to herbicides during their military service as shown by evidence of daily work duties, performance evaluation reports, or other credible evidence.

 

Our office can assist you with applying for this benefit, or any of the benefits listed on these pages. Please call us at 910-253-2233 to schedule an appointment.

BUILDING F

Contact

10 REFERENDUM DRIVE
BUILDING F

(910) 253-2233
anita.hartsell@brunswickcountync.gov
frankie.beam@brunswickcountync.gov
tracy.walts@brunswickcountync.gov
open mon-fri:
8:30 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.

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