What can I do to reduce my exposures to PFAS?

It is difficult to fully prevent PFAS exposure because PFAS are present at low levels in some foods and in the environment. However, there are steps you can take to reduce your PFAS exposure:

  • If you live near known sources of PFAS contamination or your drinking water contains PFAS above the EPA health advisory levels, you may want to use a different water source or filter your water before drinking, cooking, and preparing infant formula.
  • NC DHHS has developed a PFAS testing and treatment factsheet (PDF). This factsheet provides information on available treatment systems that have been shown to reduce PFAS concentrations in drinking water.
  • Reduce your use of products containing PFAS (packaged foods, products with non-stick or stain-resistant coatings, and some personal care products). If you have questions about the products you use in your home, contact the Consumer Product Safety Commission at 800-638-2772.
  • Boiling water will not remove PFAS.

Show All Answers

1. What is PFAS?
2. What are the health advisory levels for PFAS compounds?
3. What is the difference between an interim and final health advisory level?
4. Will EPA release an enforceable regulation for GenX in drinking water?
5. How do I know if my drinking water contains PFAS?
6. PFAS (PFOA, PFOS, GenX, PFBS) has been detected in my water. Is it safe to drink?
7. PFAS (PFOA, PFOS, GenX, PFBS) has been detected in my water supply. Can I shower, bathe, wash clothes/dishes, water my plants, etc.?
8. Can I use my water to mix my babies’ formula?
9. PFAS (PFOA, PFOS, GenX, PFBS) has been detected in my water supply. Is it safe for pets or animals?
10. What health effects should I be worried about?
11. How can I be exposed to PFAS?
12. What can I do to reduce my exposures to PFAS?
13. Is there one location where PFAS studies are summarized?