Testing and Tracing Information

COVID-19 Testing and Tracing Information

 

NOTE: If you have recently tested positive for COVID-19 and have had symptoms for 10 days or less, talk to your health care provider to see if monoclonal antibody therapy is an option for you or find a treatment center near you. Some people may qualify for preventative treatment before showing symptoms.  If you have been exposed to COVID-19, talk to your health care provider for more.

There are a number of reasons why you may be tested for COVID-19. It may be because you have COVID-19 symptoms, were a close contact of someone with COVID-19, are in a job or a population that may be at higher risk for exposure and suspect you may have been exposed to COVID-19; or are in a job or a population for which routine or repeat testing is recommended or required.

These online tools are intended to help people know if they may need a test, how to get a test, and monitor their own symptoms if advised to do so by a contact tracer. If your need additional assistance to locate a provider to test, you should contact Brunswick County Health Services for assistance.

COVID-19 Testing Information and Resources

Click on the accordion boxes below for more information about COVID-19 symptoms and testing.

Guidance On Who Should Be Tested For COVID-19

Guidance On Who Should Be Tested For COVID-19

It has never been easier or faster to get tested. If you are experiencing symptoms of COVID-19 or think you may have COVID-19, you should get tested.

Fully vaccinated individuals should get tested if they:

  • Are experiencing symptoms of COVID-19. Anyone experiencing symptoms should get tested immediately.

  • Have had close contact with someone who has COVID-19, even if they are not experiencing symptoms. You should get tested within 3-5 days after exposure.

  • Are traveling internationally and returning to the United States. Fully vaccinated international travelers are required to get tested three days before travel by air into the U.S. and should also get tested 3-5 days after their trip.

Unvaccinated individuals should get tested if they: 

  • Are experiencing symptoms of COVID-19. Anyone experiencing symptoms should get tested immediately. 

  • Have come in contact with someone who has COVID-19, even if they are not experiencing symptoms. If they do not have symptoms, they should wait at least six days after their last known exposure to COVID-19 before they get tested.

  • Take part in activities that put them at higher risk for COVID-19 because they cannot physically distance as needed to avoid exposure, such as travel, attending large social or mass gatherings, or being in crowded or poorly ventilated indoor settings.

If available through an employer or another organization, unvaccinated individuals can be part of a program where they get tested regularly for COVID-19.

 

Learn more about this guidance and see answers to frequently asked questions about testing on the NCDHHS website.

COVID-19 Symptoms

COVID-19 Symptoms

 

People with COVID-19 have had a wide range of symptoms reported – ranging from mild symptoms to severe illness.

Symptoms may appear 2-14 days after exposure to the virus. People with these symptoms may have COVID-19:

  • Fever or chills
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing
  • Fatigue
  • Muscle or body aches
  • Headache
  • New loss of taste or smell
  • Sore throat
  • Congestion or runny nose
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Diarrhea
     

This list is not all possible symptoms. Other less common symptoms have been reported, including gastrointestinal symptoms like nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea.

Anyone with more serious symptoms should call their doctor or 9-1-1 right away. More serious symptoms can include shortness of breath, difficulty breathing, chest pain or pressure, confusion or blue lips.

See more recommendations from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) on what to do if you feel sick.

COVID-19 Testing Sites in Brunswick County

COVID-19 Testing Sites in Brunswick County

 

  • You should contact your primary medical provider first if you have one to alert them of their symptoms and have a physician determine if a test is required and if they provide tests.
  • Remember to always contact these sites first to alert them of their symptoms so they can provide proper guidance and make preparations to best protect you and their staff.
  • Trying to test before or after holiday travel? Select/use “State Health Officials Have Said I Should Get a Test,” as your reason when requesting a test from a provider.
  • Uninsured individuals can seek free testing at the following locations (call ahead to schedule a visit and alert physicians/staff about symptoms):
    • Brunswick County Health Services (Bolivia; Pediatrics Only): 910-253-2276
    • CommWell Health (Bolivia Site Only): 910-567-7114
    • Goshen Medical (Southport): 910-457-0070
    • CVS Pharmacy (Leland): Register in advance at https://www.cvs.com/ / 910-371-1464
Brunswick County Health Services  (Testing for those aged 17 and under)
  • 25 Courthouse Drive, Building A, Bolivia, NC 28422
  • 910-253-2276
  • Assist: Uninsured and Insured
  • Monday through Friday: 8:30 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Novant Health Oceanside Family
  • 5145 Sellers Rd, Shallotte, NC 28470
  • 910-754-4441
  • Assist: Uninsured and Insured
  • Monday through Friday: 8 a.m. – 3 p.m.
  • Online coronavirus assessment tool found at novanthealth.org/coronavirus
  • 24/7 helpline for patients are experiencing symptoms and have questions on how to best seek care: 877-499-1697 or 877-9NOVANT
Dosher Convenient Care
  • 3009 Medical Plaza, Southport, NC 28461
  • 910-454-4732
  • Assist: Uninsured and Insured
  • Monday through Friday: 8 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.
CommWell Health
  • 4311 Old Ocean Hwy, Bolivia, NC 28422
  • 910-567-7114
  • Assist: Uninsured and Insured
  • Monday and Thursday: 8:30 a.m. – 11 a.m.
Goshen Medical
  • 4654 Long Beach Rd, Southport, NC 28461
  • 910-457-0070 (calling ahead is recommended)
  • Assist: Uninsured and Insured
  • Monday through Thursday: 7 a.m. – 5 p.m.
CVS Pharmacy (Leland)

Free tests are available at this location. Contact CVS Pharmacy for details.

  • 1132 East Cutler Crossing, Leland, NC 28451
  • Register in advance at CVS.COM
  • 910-371-1464
  • Assist: Uninsured and Insured
CVS Pharmacy (Village Road- Leland)

Free tests are available at this location. Contact CVS Pharmacy for details.

  • 117 Village Rd, Leland, NC 28451
  • Register in advance at CVS.COM
CVS Pharmacy (Shallotte)

Free tests are available at this location. Contact CVS Pharmacy for details.

  • 4553 Main Street, Shallotte, NC 28470
  • Register in advance at CVS.COM
CVS Pharmacy (Calabash)

Free tests are available at this location. Contact CVS Pharmacy for details.

  • 9810 Ocean Hwy W, Calabash, NC 28467
  • Register in advance at CVS.COM
Med First Primary and Urgent Care
  • 5130 Southport-Supply Rd SE, Southport, NC 28461
  • 910-269-2053
  • Monday through Friday: 8 a.m. – 8 p.m.; Saturday: 10 a.m. – 4 p.m.; Sunday: 10 a.m. – 2 p.m.
FastMed Urgent Care
  • 202 Village Rd, Leland, NC 28451
  • 910-782-3600
  • Monday through Friday: 8 a.m. – 8 p.m.; Saturday and Sunday: 8 a.m. – 4 p.m.
Public Health Call Lines and Email Information

Public Health Call Lines and Email Information

 

Brunswick County Public Health Call Line (Available Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.)

The County is operating a joint information center with a Public Health Call Line and email to answer residents’ coronavirus questions (available Monday-Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., excluding county-observed holidays).

Community Care of North Carolina’s  COVID-19 Triage Plus (Available 7 a.m. to 11 p.m. daily)

CCNC’s COVID-19 Triage Plus is a toll-free helpline aimed at answering patients’ COVID-19 questions and helping them find the care they need. COVID-19 Triage Plus staff are local, NC-licensed RNs experienced in care management who will assist any North Carolina resident regardless of insurance coverage or lack of coverage. Through an agreement with the NC Department of Health and Human Services, CCNC will staff this helpline from 7 a.m. to 11 p.m., seven days a week.

  • COVID-19 Triage Plus Patient Information and Support Line: 1-877-490-6642

Individuals who have questions afterhours are encouraged to use the North Carolina 2-1-1 program or call the North Carolina Public Health Call Line, which has public health professionals available 24 hours a day every day to answer questions.

NC Public Health Call Line (Open 24/7)
  • 1.866.462.3821
North Carolina 2-1-1 Program
  • For COVID-19 questions, dial 2-1-1 or 888-892-1162
  • Sign up for updates by texting COVIDNC to 898211
What to Do While I Wait for My Test Results

What to Do While I Wait for My Test Results

If you have any COVID-19 symptoms, were tested because you were exposed to someone with COVID-19, or you suspect you may have been exposed to COVID-19, you should stay home and, as much as possible, avoid others in your household. In addition, if you were tested because you have COVID-19 symptoms, everyone in your household should stay at home as much as possible until your results are known.

If you were tested for COVID-19 but have no symptoms and no known or suspected exposure to someone with COVID19 (for example, as part of a workplace screening program), you do not need to stay home while waiting for your results unless you are told to do so by your employer or by a public health official.

See the full guidance from the NCDHHS here.

How can I keep others safe after getting tested?

How can I keep others safe after getting tested?

Now that you’ve been tested, here’s what to do next to protect the people you care about and your community.

Make a list. Think of people you’ve spent time with over the past two weeks or so and make a list. In case you test positive, you will already be prepared to take the first, most urgent step: sharing this list with your local health department’s team to help alert others who might be at risk. Scroll below to download a form to make this list.

Stay home. If you can, be in a room by yourself with the door closed and use your own bathroom. Do your best to stay away from other people until you get your test result, and to always wear a mask if you are near people.

Answer the call! If you test positive, you’ll get a phone call or text from a member of the COVID-19 Community Outreach Team, who is from your local health department. They will answer your questions, offer advice on taking care of yourself, and may be able to connect you to available support such as delivery of groceries, medications, and COVID-19 related supplies like masks and a thermometer.

Share. You’ll communicate by phone call, text or email with the NC COVID Community Team about the people you’ve been around recently. Then the NC COVID Community Team will notify them by phone call, text or email of their exposure and provide them with information on how to safely quarantine and get tested.This is done confidentially, which means your name will not be given. At no point will you be asked to provide your Social Security number, bank account or credit card information, or immigration status. We encourage you to notify your own close contacts of their exposure if you feel comfortable doing so, either directly or anonymously using TellYourContacts.org.

Rest assured. The NC COVID Community Team will keep your identity private. Your personal health information is also protected and not shared with other government agencies – that’s the law.

BE THE ONE. If you receive an email from NC-ARIAS-NoReply at dhhs.nc.gov or see your local health department or NC Outreach (844-628-7223) appear on your phone via text or call, please answer us to protect your community and the people you care about. You may also call NC Outreach (844-628-7223) to learn more about available support to stay healthy.

Learn more about how you can help slow the spread and help with contact tracing. Review this fact sheet in English and Spanish.

What if my test is negative?

What if my test is negative?

If you were tested because you have symptoms, you should stay home until you have no fever without the use of fever-reducing medicines, and you have felt well for at least 24 hours.

If you were tested because you have symptoms and a healthcare provider still thinks you have COVID-19, even with a negative test, you should stay home and, as much as possible, avoid others in your household until you can say yes to ALL three of the following questions:

  • Has it been at least 10 days since you first had symptoms?
  • Has it been at least 24 hours (1 day) since you have had a fever without using fever-reducing medicine?
  • Have your other symptoms improved (such as coughing and shortness of breath)?

A test-based strategy is no longer recommended to discontinue isolation or precautions and employers should not require documentation of a negative test before allowing a worker to return.

If you were tested because of a known contact to someone with COVID-19, you should stay home and quarantine (avoid anyone in your household) until 14 days after the last time you were in contact with the person who tested positive. Having a negative test during that period is a good thing, but there is still a chance that it may take up to 14 days after
exposure to COVID-19 for the virus to present itself and infect someone. That’s why it is important that you monitor your symptoms closely. If you develop any symptoms, then you may have COVID-19. Check with your medical provider, the COVID-19 Community Team, or get tested again.

If you were tested for another reason that is not because of a known or suspected contact with someone who tested positive for COVID-19 and have no symptoms, then you can resume your regular activities.

What if my test is positive?

What if my test is positive?

Following CDC guidelines, if your test comes back positive and you had symptoms, you should stay home and, as much as possible, avoid others in your household until you can say yes to ALL three of the following questions:

  • Has it been at least 10 days since you first had symptoms?
  • Has it been at least 24 hours (1 day) since you have had a fever without using fever-reducing medicine?
  • Have your other symptoms improved (such as coughing and shortness of breath)?

If you have recently tested positive for COVID-19 and have had symptoms for 10 days or less, talk to your health care provider to see if monoclonal antibody therapy is an option for you or find a treatment center near you.

Following CDC guidelines, if your test comes back positive and you did not have symptoms, you should stay home and isolate (avoid anyone in your household) until 10 days have passed since the date of your first positive COVID-19 diagnostic test, assuming you did not develop symptoms since your positive test.

Additionally, if you have tested positive for COVID-19, the local health department or another member of the COVID-19 Community Team will call to ensure you have the information and support you need, such as tips for staying at home and monitoring symptoms. To protect your family and friends and slow the spread of the virus, the COVID-19 Community Team member will also ask you who you have recently been near – for example, people living in your household or people who have been within 6 feet of you for more than 15 minutes. The COVID-19 Community Team will reach out to anyone who has been near you to share information and support, as well as help them get tested. They should stay home and quarantine until 14 days after the last time they were in contact with you while you were able to spread the infection.

The team will not share your name or personal information. This information is confidential and will remain private. However, if you are comfortable, please share this information with everyone in your household and any of your close contacts. If the COVID-19 Community Team does not get in contact with you, please call your local health department.

How can I practice home care?

How can I practice home care?

If you cannot meet the requirements where you currently live, the COVID-19 Community Team can help to connect you to resources that can help.

  • Stay home except to seek medical care. Do not go to work, school, or public areas.
  • Do not use public transportation, ride shares, or taxis.
  • Separate yourself from others in your home, especially people who are at higher risk of serious illness.
  • Stay in a specific room and away from other people in your home as much as possible. Use a separate bathroom, if available.
  • Do not prepare or serve food to others.
  • Do not allow visitors into your home.

Other helpful recommendations include:

  • Rest and drink plenty of fluids. You may take acetaminophen (Tylenol®) to reduce fever and pain. Do not give children younger than age 2 years any medications without first checking with a doctor. Note that medicines do not “cure” COVID-19 and do not stop you from spreading the virus.
  • Seek medical care if your symptoms get worse, especially if you are at a higher risk of serious illness.
  • Symptoms that indicate you should seek medical care include: difficulty breathing, not being able to keep fluids down, dehydration, confusion and other serious symptoms.
  • If possible, call ahead before going to your doctor’s office or hospital to tell them you are isolating for COVID19. This will help the health care personnel prepare for your arrival and protect others from getting infected.
    • Do not wait in any waiting rooms and do wear a cloth face covering over your nose and mouth or mask
      at all times if possible.
    • Do not use public transportation.
    • If you call 911, first notify the dispatch and paramedics that you are under isolation for COVID-19.
How can I help slow the spread?

How can I help slow the spread?

Everyone should continue to practice the 3 Ws (Wear. Wait. Wash.) whenever they leave home. Wearing a cloth mask over your mouth and nose if you will be with other people, waiting 6 feet apart from others, and washing your hands often can help protect you and your loved ones from the spread of this virus.

Clean and disinfect all high-touch surfaces daily (including counters, tabletops, doorknobs, faucets, toilets, phones, tv remotes, keys, keyboards), and especially any surfaces that may have body fluids on them.

Quarantine Guidance for the General Community

Quarantine Guidance for the General Community

Per the CDC, quarantine guidance for the general public includes:

Standard Quarantine Period
  • 14 days have passed since the last date of exposure to COVID-19 AND
  • No symptoms have developed during this time period
People Who Have Received the COVID-19 Vaccine

Per the CDC, people who have received the COVID-19 vaccine do not need to quarantine if they meet all of the following criteria:

  • Are fully vaccinated (i.e., at least 2 weeks after getting their second dose in a 2-dose series or one-dose of a single-dose series)
  • Have had no symptoms from when they were exposed to someone with COVID-19
  • Live outside of a group setting. Individuals in group settings such as group homes, jails, etc., still need to quarantine following an exposure.

After an exposure of COVID-19, fully vaccinated individuals should get tested 3-5 days after exposure and wear a mask around others until you get a negative test result.

For more information, please see NCDHHS’s Interim Guidance for Individuals Who have Been Vaccinated.

Recognizing the challenges on both individuals out of work and our public health system, CDC released guidance on alternative options to reduce the quarantine period. These options are listed below.

However, your local public health authorities make the final decisions about how long quarantine should last, based on local conditions and needs. Please follow the recommendations of your local public health department if you need to quarantine.

Alternative Option 1
  • 10 days have passed since the last date of exposure to COVID-19 AND
  • No symptoms have developed during this time period
Alternative Option 2
  • 7 days have passed since the last date of exposure to COVID-19 AND
  • No symptoms have developed during this time period AND
  • The contact has a negative PCR or antigen-based test collected at least 5 days after the last date of exposure to COVID-19

While the recommended quarantine period continues to be 14 days since the last date of exposure to COVID-19, current data demonstrate that only 2% of exposed persons develop illness after more than 10 days of the last exposure to COVID-19. This means that the quarantine period can be shortened with only a small increased risk of transmission. If quarantine is discontinued before day 14, the individual must continue to monitor for symptoms and strictly adhere to all prevention measures (e.g., mask wearing, social distancing, etc.) until 14 days after the last date of exposure.

Child Care and K-12 Settings

NCDHHS recommends following the above CDC guidance in these settings, including utilizing the standard quarantine period or alternative options and the post-vaccination guidance.

Additionally, after a close contact in a classroom or child care setting, children who are not fully vaccinated do NOT need to quarantine, if masks were being worn appropriately and consistently by both the person with COVID-19 and the potential exposed person. This is based on updated CDC guidance and studies that have shown extremely low risk of COVID-19 transmission in classroom settings when face masks were being used appropriately by both the person with COVID-19 and the potentially exposed person, as well as multiple layers of prevention measures in place to prevent transmission in school settings. This applies to exposures in classrooms, other in-school and child care settings, and school transportation but does not apply to exposures during extracurricular or athletic activities. This exception does not apply to teachers, staff, or other adults in the indoor classroom setting.

Congregate Living Facilities

NCDHHS strongly recommends that a full 14-day quarantine (regardless of vaccination status) be implemented in congregate living facilities that are at higher risk for secondary clusters or where residents may be at higher risk for severe illness. This includes nursing homes, residential care facilities and correctional facilities.

Read additional information on the CDC website

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Contact Tracing Next Steps After Testing

Contact Tracing Next Steps After Testing

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