Vaccines

COVID-19 Vaccines

All community members aged 12 or older are eligible for COVID-19 vaccines

Note: Those aged 12-17 are eligible for the Pfizer version of the vaccine only. Health Services requires written permission from a parent/guardian to administer vaccines to those aged 12-15.

Where Can I get a COVID-19 Vaccine?

Brunswick County Main Clinic in Shallotte (Appointments required)

Brunswick County Health Services requires appointments for vaccinations at its drive-thru clinic at Coastal Cinemas 10 in Shallotte (5200 Bridgers Road).

Health Services is currently scheduling appointments for first and second doses for everyone aged 12 and up, third additional doses of the Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna (mRNA) vaccines for the immunocompromised, and Pfizer-BioNTech booster vaccines for eligible individuals (see eligibility requirements below).

At this time, only the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine is approved for emergency authorized use as a booster vaccine. Individuals must receive the same version of the vaccine for any subsequent doses for which they are eligible.

Brunswick County Health Services offers two ways to schedule an appointment:

  • Schedule online here
  • Call the Public Health Call Line at 910.253.2339 (Open Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., excluding county-observed holidays)

Anyone who needs to speak with someone or who does not have access to a computer or Internet can call the Public Health Call Line for assistance with appointments.

Schedule My Appointment

All vaccinations take place at Coastal Cinemas 10 in Shallotte (5200 Bridgers Road).

Note: Individuals will create an account when they select an appointment slot to receive a confirmation and other notifications about their appointment(s). The online scheduling system is available in English and Spanish.

Public Health Call Line: 910.253.2339

Open Monday through Friday from
9 a.m. to 5 p.m., excluding county-observed holidays

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Brunswick County Health Services can accommodate vaccines for individuals who received their first dose somewhere else. Bring documentation of your first dose in the event we are unable to locate your records in CVMS.

Other Vaccination Opportunities

COVID-19 vaccines may be available at the following locations, as supplies are available. Make sure you check with these locations directly for questions about their vaccination process and/or events and to see if you need to schedule an appointment first.

Additional Doses and Boosters

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Additional third doses of the Pfizer and Moderna (mRNA) vaccines for moderately to severely immunocompromised people are available to eligible community members. Individuals are required to self-attest to being moderately to severely immunocompromised when they arrive for their third dose appointment. Additional third doses should be administered at least 28 days after the second dose.

Booster vaccines are available only to the following individuals who have been fully vaccinated for six months or more with the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends:

  • People 65 years and older and residents in long-term care settings should receive a booster shot of Pfizer-BioNTech’s COVID-19 vaccine
  • People aged 50 to 64 with certain underlying medical conditions should receive a booster shot of Pfizer-BioNTech’s COVID-19 vaccine
  • People 18 to 49 who are at high risk for severe COVID-19 due to certain underlying medical conditions may receive a booster shot of Pfizer-BioNTech’s COVID-19 vaccine
  • People aged 18-64 years who are at increased risk for COVID-19 exposure and transmission because of occupational or institutional setting may receive a booster shot of Pfizer-BioNTech’s COVID-19 vaccine

At this time, only the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine is approved for emergency authorized use as a booster vaccine. Individuals must receive the same version of the vaccine for any subsequent doses for which they are eligible.

 

CDC expands eligibility for Pfizer vaccine to those aged 12-15

CDC expands eligibility for Pfizer vaccine to those aged 12-15

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) director issued their official recommendation Wednesday, May 12 to begin offering and vaccinating 12- through 15-year-old adolescents with the Pfizer vaccine. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration authorized emergency use of the Pfizer vaccine for those aged 12 through 15 Monday, May 10.

Addressing recommendations about the J&J Vaccine

Addressing recommendations about the J&J Vaccine

The CDC and FDA lifted the recommended pause of the Johnson & Johnson vaccine April 24. The North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services (NCDHHS) is recommending that providers in the state resume administration of the vaccine now that the CDC and FDA have reaffirmed its safety.

Individuals interested in the Johnson & Johnson vaccine can check the County’s online scheduling system for appointments using that vaccine.

Frequently Asked Questions

Are there vaccines that are safe and work in preventing COVID-19?

Yes. Three vaccines from Pfizer-BioNTech, Moderna and Johnson & Johnson (Janssen) have proven to provide significant protection against COVID-19 and protect against virus-related hospitalization and death, with no serious safety concerns in the clinical trials.

Who verifies that the vaccines are safe and can prevent COVID-19?

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) makes sure all food and drugs are safe. The COVID-19 vaccines must pass clinical trials like other drugs and vaccines. The FDA checks the work and authorizes vaccines only if they are safe and effective. Because vaccines are given to millions of healthy people to prevent serious diseases, they’re held to very high safety standards.

The FDA can get vaccines to people faster through an Emergency Use Authorization. After the FDA has authorized a vaccine, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) independent advisory committee reviews the data before advising the CDC on recommending a vaccine for use among the general public. Like all vaccines, the FDA keeps checking safety through the Vaccine Adverse Events Reporting System (VAERS). Health care providers are required to report serious side effects, or if someone gets seriously ill with COVID-19. There is also a smartphone-based health checker called V-SAFE that uses text messaging and web surveys to do health check-ins after people receive a COVID-19 vaccination. People can report any problems they may have with a vaccine through V-SAFE.

What is an Emergency Use Authorization (EUA)?
An Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) allows the FDA to get a safe COVID-19 vaccine to you quickly during a public health emergency. An independent advisory committee makes sure the vaccines are safe and work before issuing an EUA.

  • Pfizer applied for an EUA on November 20, 2020, the advisory committee recommended authorization on December 10, 2020 and the EUA was approved on December 11, 2020.
  • Moderna applied for an EUA on November 30, 2020, the advisory committee recommended authorization on December 17, 2020 and the EUA was approved on December 18, 2020.
  • Johnson & Johnson (Janssen) applied for an EUA on February 4, 2021, the advisory committee recommended authorization on February 26, 2021 and the EUA was approved on February 27, 2021.
What happens after an EUA is issued?

The Center for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices will review the data and recommend who should be vaccinated based on clinical trial results. This ensures that the vaccine is safe and effective for those who get it.

How much vaccine will the state receive?

Once a vaccine is authorized for use by the FDA, states will receive very limited supplies, at first. The federal government will determine the number of COVID-19 vaccines each state will receive. The amount of vaccine sent to states will be based on the size of the state’s population. 

Will I be able to choose which vaccine I get?

Due to the limited supply of COVID-19 vaccines, we strongly recommend people take the vaccine that is offered to them. All three available vaccines are highly effective in preventing hospitalization and death caused by COVID-19. The Pfizer vaccine is approved for adults over the age of 16, while the Moderna and Johnson & Johnson vaccines are approved for adults 18 and older.

How will the vaccine be stored?

We have a plan to store the vaccines safely, so they can be effective. North Carolina is prepared to receive vaccines that require ultra-cold storage or frozen storage as soon as they become available from the federal government. Eleven hospital sites across the state have been identified that have the greatest capacity for ultra-cold storage for the anticipated Pfizer vaccine. Vaccines that require ultra-cold storage will come with packaging and cooling material to meet the storage requirements for sites that do not have permanent ultra-cold storage. The Moderna vaccine does not require ultra-cold storage. The state and CDC will deliver training on COVID-19 vaccine storage, handling and administration based on federal recommendations and product information from vaccine manufacturers.

How will staff and residents in long-term care facilities be vaccinated?

The federal government is managing vaccinations for most staff and residents of long-term care facilities, however, those doses will come from the state’s allotment. Long-term care facilities include skilled nursing facilities, adult care homes, family care homes, group homes and intermediate care facilities for individuals with intellectual disabilities. The federal government, in coordination with the CDC, has created the Pharmacy Partnership for Long-Term Care Program with CVS and Walgreens to vaccinate people in these settings. These pharmacies will work directly with long-term care facilities to provide vaccines separate from the vaccination efforts being coordinated by the state.

Are there side effects from the vaccines?

So far, no serious side effects have been reported. However, people have reported temporary reactions like sore arms, fevers and tiredness 24-48 hours after receiving the vaccine. As a result, vaccinations in prioritized settings, such as hospitals and long-term care facilities, may be staggered. We will have more information on the side effects from the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines when the findings from the clinical trials become available. 

If two shots are necessary, how will people know when to get their second shot?

The Pfizer, Moderna and AstraZeneca vaccines require two doses, given a set number of days apart. It is important to know when a person received the first dose of vaccine, and which vaccine, to ensure they receive the second dose of the same vaccine at the right time. The shot you take, and when you need the second dose, is health information that is carefully managed to protect your privacy. North Carolina will use a secure data system called the COVID-19 Vaccine Management System (CVMS) to manage vaccinations. When a person gets a first dose, they will be given information on when to come back for a second dose and asked to make a second appointment. They will also be given a card with information about which vaccine they got for their first dose and the date of that dose.

How much will the vaccines cost?

The COVID-19 vaccine will be available to everyone for free, whether or not you have health insurance. The federal government will be purchasing the vaccines.

Will people who have been vaccinated still need to wear a mask and avoid close contact with others?

Yes. While experts learn more about the protection that COVID-19 vaccines provide under real-life conditions, it will be important for everyone to continue using all the tools available to us to help stop this pandemic, like the 3 Ws (wearing a mask, waiting 6 feet apart, washing your hands) and limiting gatherings. Receiving the COVID-19 vaccination and following the 3 Ws will offer the best protection from getting and spreading COVID-19.

Will people who have been vaccinated still need to be quarantined?

Experts need to understand more about the protection that COVID-19 vaccines provide before deciding to change recommendations on whether people who are vaccinated still need to be quarantined if they have been in close contact with someone who has COVID-19.

Do people who have had COVID-19 still need to be vaccinated?

Until we have a vaccine available, the FDA releases information as part of the EUA, and the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices makes recommendations on how to best use COVID-19 vaccines, the CDC cannot comment on whether people who had COVID-19 should get a vaccine. We don’t know enough to say if having had COVID-19 creates natural immunity or how long that may last. Early data suggests that natural immunity from COVID-19 may not last very long, but more studies are needed to better understand.

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