Public Notice

Public Notice

Brunswick County Coronavirus / Hurricane Information

09.22.2020

See Latest Coronavirus Information & Case Counts >> brunswickcountync.gov/alert-ticker/information-on-coronavirus/

County Contact Information & Virtual Services During the Coronavirus Pandemic

Brunswick County is urging individuals to visit our website and to call or email county departments for assistance first before visiting county offices. The County now requires appointments for in-person visits. Not sure who to contact? Call our main line and we can help direct your calls.

  • Main County Contact Information: 910.253.2000 / 800.442.7033

 

Brunswick County Public Health Call Line and Email Information (Available Monday-Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.)

 

NC Public Health Call Line (Open 24/7)

  • Phone: 1.866.462.3821

 

North Carolina 2-1-1 Program

  • For COVID-19 questions, dial 2-1-1 or 888-892-1162
  • Sign up for updates by texting COVIDNC to 898211

 

View: Brunswick County declares a state of emergency due to COVID-19 (March 24, 2020)

 

See the latest information about vegetative debris collection on private roads in the unincorporated areas of the county due to Isaias >> https://www.brunswickcountync.gov/isaiasdebris

Residents on private roads in the unincorporated areas of Brunswick County need to place their vegetative debris from Hurricane Isaias in in the right-of-way of their property no later than the evening of Sunday, Aug. 30 for collection.

Click here for full details and instructions on this collection.

Crews will make one pass across the county and could arrive in any area as early as Monday. Any vegetative debris that is not on the right-of-way by Sunday evening will not be collected.

A right-of-way is generally defined as the edge of your property before the curb. If you have a sidewalk, ditch, or utility line in front of your house, make sure that your debris does not cover or restrict these areas.

This service will only include the private roads in the unincorporated areas of the county, including private roads in gated communities. The service will also collect any tree hangers or leaners in the rights-of-way.

This service will not collect or remove tree hangers or leaners that are on private property outside of a right-of-way.

Residents who need assistance to move debris or other needs following Hurricane Isaias can contact the Brunswick County VOAD for guidance and direction to organizations or services that may be able to help: 910-253-2589

 

Visit our Hurricane Preparedness page for more resources and information.

NCDEQ: Water quality swimming alert lifted for sound-side site in Brunswick County

09.17.2020

Water quality swimming alert lifted for sound-side site in Brunswick County

Link: https://deq.nc.gov/news/press-releases/2020/09/17/water-quality-swimming-alert-lifted-sound-side-site-brunswick-county

MOREHEAD CITY – State recreational water quality officials today lifted a water quality swimming alert at a sound-side site in Brunswick County.

Subsequent sampling of the site shows that bacteria levels have dropped below the state’s and Environmental Protection Agency’s standards set for swimming and water play.

The alert affected waters at access #1 between the Bald Head Harbor entrance and the mouth of Bald Head Creek in Bald Head Island. Water samples taken on Sept.15 showed the site had exceeded the single-sample maximum standard of 104 enterococci per 100 milliliters of water for a Tier 1 high usage site. Subsequent testing on Sept. 16 showed the bacteria level at 10 enterococci per 100 milliliters.

Enterococci, the bacteria group used for testing, are found in the intestines of warm-blooded animals. While it is not known to cause illness, scientific studies indicate that enterococci may indicate the presence of other disease-causing organisms. People swimming or playing in waters with bacteria levels higher than the standards have an increased risk of developing gastrointestinal illness or skin infections.

Coastal recreational waters in North Carolina are generally clean. However, it is important to continue monitoring them, so the public can be informed of any localized problems. The N.C. Recreational Water Quality Program samples 210 sites in coastal waters of the state, most of them on a weekly basis from April through October.

For more information on the N.C. Recreational Water Quality Program, visit the program’s website, view a map of the testing sites, and follow the program’s Twitter feed.

Contact Information

Water quality swimming alert issued for sound-side site in Brunswick County

State recreational water quality officials today are alerting the public that initial testing at a sound-side site in Brunswick County showed levels of bacteria exceeding the state’s and Environmental Protection Agency’s recreational water quality swimming standards.

The alert is for waters at access #1 between the Bald Head Harbor entrance and the mouth of Bald Head Creek in Bald Head Island. Test results of water samples collected yesterday show 111 enterococci per 100 milliliters of water, which exceeds the state and federal single-sample standard of 104 enterococci per 100 milliliters for Tier 1 high-usage sites. Swimming areas are classified based on recreational use and are referred to as tiers.

State officials will sample the site again today, and test results of the sampling will dictate further action. If the new samples also show elevated bacteria counts, state officials will post a swimming advisory sign and issue a swimming advisory.

The N.C. Recreational Water Quality Program tests water quality at ocean and sound beaches in accordance with federal and state laws.

Enterococci, the bacteria group used for testing, are found in the intestines of warm-blooded animals. While it is not known to cause illness, scientific studies indicate that enterococci may indicate the presence of other disease-causing organisms. People swimming or playing in waters with bacteria levels higher than the standards have an increased risk of developing gastrointestinal illness or skin infections.

State officials sample 210 sites throughout the coastal region, most of them on a weekly basis from April to October. Testing continues on a reduced schedule during the rest of the year, when the waters are colder.

For more information on the N.C. Recreational Water Quality Program, visit the program’s website, view a map of the testing sites, and follow the program’s Twitter feed.